All windows startup sound

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Windows starting-sounds

The visitcard of windows is the music, which will played when windows is starting.

All single files can be found here:

Windows 3.1x & Windows NT 3.xx

Tada.wav called this start-up sound, which is just a second.

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The Shutdown Sound: Xylophon.wav

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Windows 3.1(1) for Workgroups

Interestingly, the other way around WfW uses the sounds for starting and ending as the normal 3.1 versions and NT. It is the shortest sound with less than a second. Original name Xylophon.wav

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Shutdown Sound tada.wav.

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Windows 95 (all)

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Nothing per default, but when installing all audio files in setup and load the default sound scheme you hear the shutdown sound tada.wav.

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Windows NT 4.0

Actually, the login sound. Duration 10 seconds.

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Windows 98 (SE)

The modern interpretation of the Windows 95 Sound. Duration of approximately 7 seconds.

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Nothing per default, but when installing all audio files in setup and load the default sound scheme you hear the logoff sound.

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NT 5.0 (Win 2000 Beta)

Probably the strangest sound. Created for a beta version, not used in the final product. Matthew A Felton was an composer. Duration 13 seconds.

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Windows Me & Windows 2000

The Windows 2000 Sound is just 5 seconds.

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No sound per default. With ME you have to load the non-default `Windows-defaultВґ sound scheme. In Win 2000 the file is present, but not used in the default scheme.

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Windows XP

Lasts 4 seconds. Unfortunately there is no information about the artist.

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Windows Vista / 7 / 8 / 10

Length: 4 second. Watch a Making of Video on Channel 9.

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How to enable and change the Startup sound in Windows 10

Windows 10 goes down arguably as the easiest to use computer operating system around. Among many great features it offers, its auditory signals notify you of when your attention is needed or when a task has been completed. Windows offers audio notifications for battery alerts, errors, disconnection of peripherals, a complete Startup, and much more.

The Startup sound is the most common many users are used to. To show how serious it meant to them, Microsoft contacted Brian Eno, a significant pioneer of ambient music, to play the Startup sound for Windows 95. As you know, each sound is a notification of some sort; the Startup sound indicates that the system has booted successfully.

When you select the shutdown option, Fast Boot puts your PC in a Hibernate mode, and when you restart it, it quickly turns your PC on, skipping the Start sound and restoring it to where you left off. So to change the sound, you have first to disable Fast Boot.

How to change the Windows 10 Startup sound

Now, let’s take a closer look at the above steps to show you how to go about them.

1] Disable Fast startup

Microsoft gave up the startup sound to make way for the Fast startup feature in Windows 10. Fast startup works by keeping all your programs and applications running even after you shut down your PC.

You need to open your Power Options by right-clicking on the battery icon on your taskbar. Next, click on Choose what the power buttons do.

On the next screen, go to Change settings that are currently unavailable.

Uncheck the box labeled Turn on fast start (recommended) and finally, click on the Save changes button.

2] Enable Windows 10 startup sound

Press the Windows key + I combination to open Windows Settings.

Go to Personalization and select Themes from the left-hand panel.

Locate and click the Sound button then mark the Play Windows Startup sound checkbox, which is under the Sounds tab.

Click on OK to confirm the settings.

3] Enable the logon sound from the Windows Registry

Please, follow the steps below carefully as they may seem a bit complicated. You will be working with the Registry Editor to change your PC’s Startup sound.

Type in Regedit in the Run dialogue box and click OK.

Click ExcludeFromCPL on WindowsLogon.

Next, change the Value data from 1 to .

Hit OK.

4] Customize the Startup sound from Windows Settings

Open Windows Settings and select Personalization > Themes. Click on Sounds and then scroll down to the Program Events list. Find and click on the Windows Logon option then select Browse. Locate your customized .WAV Start sound from File Explorer, Apply the changes and click on OK.

Change the startup sound using free tool

The complexity involved in the method above is a path not everyone is willing to take. However, with a third-party tool like Startup Sound Changer, you can go about this easily. If you decide to use Startup Sound Changer, follow the steps below.

Go to its official site and download and install the application. Launch the app and select the Replace button from the options presented. Find your desired sound with the Windows Explorer and select it.

Note: Windows Startup sound can only be in the .WAV audio format.

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Fix sound problems in Windows 10

If you’re having audio problems, the following suggestions might help. The tips are listed in order, so start with the first one, see if that helps, and then continue to the next one if it doesn’t.

If multiple audio output devices are available, check that you have the appropriate one selected. Here’s how:

Select the Speakers icon on the taskbar.

Next, select the arrow to open a list of audio devices connected to your computer.

Check that your audio is playing to the audio device you prefer, such as a speaker or headphones.

If this doesn’t help, continue to the next tip.

The audio troubleshooter might be able to fix audio problems automatically.

To run the troubleshooter

In the search box on the taskbar, type audio troubleshooter, select Fix and find problems with playing sound from the results, then select Next.

Select the device you want to troubleshoot and then continue through the troubleshooter.

You can also launch the troubleshooter from audio Settings. Select Start > Settings > System > Sound > Troubleshoot.

If running the troubleshooter doesn’t help, continue to the next tip.

To check for updates

Select Start > Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update > Check for updates.

Do one of the following:

If the status says «You’re up to date, go to the next tip.

If the status says «Updates are available,» select Install now.

Select the updates you want to install, then select Install.

Restart your PC and see if your sound is working properly.

If that didn’t solve your problem, continue to the next tip.

Check your speaker and headphone connections for loose cords or cables. Make sure all cords and cables are plugged in.

If you have multiple 5mm jacks to plug into, especially on a surround sound system, make sure all cords and cables are plugged into the correct jack.

If it’s not clear which jack goes with which cord, consult your hardware manufacturer, or try the most obvious outputs one at a time and see if they work.

Note: Some systems use a green jack for output and pink for mic input and others will be labeled «headphone» or «microphone.»

Make sure the power is turned on and check the volume level.

Make sure the mute setting is not turned on, and try turning up all the volume controls.

Remember some speakers and apps have their own volume controls. Be sure to check them all.

Try connecting your speaker and headphones to a different USB port.

It’s possible that your speakers won’t work when your headphones are plugged in. Unplug your headphones and see if that helps.

If your cables and volume are OK, see the next sections for additional troubleshooting.

Check to make sure your audio devices aren’t muted and haven’t been disabled.

Right-click the Speakers icon on the taskbar, and then select Open Volume mixer.

You’ll see a set of volume controls for your devices. Make sure none of them are muted. If any of them are muted, you’ll see a red circle with a line through it next to the volume control. In that case, select the volume control to unmute.

Select your audio device, and then select Device properties. Be sure to select Device properties for both the output and input devices.

Make sure the Disable check box is cleared for the output and input devices.

If that didn’t solve your problem, continue to the next tip.

Hardware problems can be caused by outdated or malfunctioning drivers. Make sure your audio driver is up to date and update it if needed. If that doesn’t work, try uninstalling the audio driver (it will reinstall automatically). If that doesn’t work, try using the generic audio driver that comes with Windows. If you’re having audio issues after installing updates, try rolling back your audio driver.

To update your audio driver automatically

In the search box on the taskbar, type device manager, then select it from the results.

Select the arrow next to Sound, video and game controllers to expand it.

Right-click the listing for your sound card or audio device, such as headphones or speakers, select Update driver, then select Search automatically for updated driver software. Follow the instructions to complete the update.

If Windows doesn’t find a new driver, look for one on the device manufacturer’s website and follow those instructions. If that doesn’t work, try uninstalling your audio driver.

To uninstall your audio driver

In the search box on the taskbar, type device manager, then select it from the results.

Select the arrow next to Sound, video and game controllers to expand it.

Right-click the listing for your sound card or audio device, select Uninstall device, select the Delete the driver software for this device check box, and then select Uninstall.

Note: Be sure to save documents and any other current work before you restart.

This restart will automatically prompt your PC to reinstall your audio driver.

If those options didn’t work, try using the generic audio driver that comes with Windows.

To use the generic audio driver that comes with Windows

In the search box on the taskbar, type device manager, then select it from the results.

Select the arrow next to Sound, video and game controllers to expand it.

Right-click the listing for your sound card or audio device, then select Update driver > Browse my computer for driver software > Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer.

Select the audio device whose driver you want to update, select Next, and then follow the instructions to install it.

If these steps didn’t solve your audio issue, visit your device manufacturer’s website and install the most recent audio/sound drivers for your device. Following is an example of a driver download page for a sound device manufacturer.

If you have audio issues after installing updates

If your audio was working before you ran Windows Update and now isn’t working, try rolling back your audio driver.

To roll back your audio driver

In the search box on the taskbar, type device manager, then select it from the results.

Select the arrow next to Sound, video and game controllers to expand it.

Right-click the listing for your sound card or audio device, then select Properties.

Select the Driver tab, then select Roll Back Driver.

Read and follow the instructions and then select Yes if you want to roll back your audio driver.

If rolling back your audio driver didn’t work or wasn’t an option, you can try to restore your PC from a system restore point.

Restore your PC from a system restore point

When Microsoft installs updates on your system, we create a system restore point in case problems arise. Try restoring from that point and see if that fixes your sound problems. For more info, see «Restore from a system restore point» in Recovery options in Windows 10.

If you’re connecting to an audio device—such as headphones or speakers—using USB or HDMI, you might need to set that device as the default audio device. If you’re using an external monitor that doesn’t have built-in speakers, make sure that the monitor isn’t already selected as your default output device. if it is, you won’t have any audio. You can check that when you set your default output audio device. Here’s how:

In the search box on the taskbar, type control panel, then select it from the results.

Select Hardware and Sound from the Control Panel, and then select Sound.

On the Playback tab, right-click the listing for your audio device, select Set as Default Device, and then select OK.

If setting your audio device as the default device doesn’t help, continue to the next tip for additional troubleshooting.

Sometimes having audio enhancements on can result in audio issues. Disabling them may resolve your issue.

In the search box on the taskbar, type control panel, then select it from the results.

Select Hardware and Sound from the Control Panel, and then select Sound.

On the Playback tab, right-click the Default Device, and then select Properties.

On the Enhancements tab, select either the Disable all enhancements or the Disable all sound effects check box (depending on which option you see), select OK, and try to play your audio device.

If that doesn’t work, on the Playback tab, select another default device (if you have one), select either the Disable all enhancements or the Disable all sound effects check box (depending on which option you see), select OK, and try to play audio again. Do this for each default device.

If turning off audio enhancements doesn’t help, see the next sections for additional troubleshooting.

In the search box on the taskbar, type services, then select it from the results.

Select each of the following services, right-click, and then select Restart:

Windows Audio Endpoint Builder

Remote Procedure Call (RPC)

If restarting these services doesn’t resolve your issue, see the next sections for more troubleshooting.

In the search box on the taskbar, type control panel, and then select it from the results.

Select Hardware and Sound from the Control Panel, and then select Sound.

On the Playback tab, right-click (or press and hold) Default Device, and then select Properties.

On the Advanced tab, under Default Format, change the setting, select OK,and then test your audio device. If that doesn’t work, try changing the setting again.

If trying different audio formats doesn’t help, see the next sections for additional troubleshooting.

Many updates require you to restart your device.

To check and see if you have installed updates pending and need to restart

Save your work and close all open applications.

Select one of those restart options to apply the updates

If restarting doesn’t help, see the next section for additional troubleshooting.

Some audio problems might be caused by an issue with the audio system’s IDT High Definition Audio CODEC. This can be fixed with a manual driver update which allows you to choose the sound driver you want to use.

Note: Not all systems will have an IDT High Definition Audio CODEC.

To check and see if you have one, and to manually update the driver

In the search box on the taskbar, type device manager, then select it from the results.

Select the arrow next to Sound, video and game controllers to expand it.

Look for IDT High Definition Audio CODEC. If it’s listed, right-click it and select Update driver, then select Browse my computer for driver software > Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer.

You’ll see a list of pre-installed drivers. Select High Definition Audio Device, and then select Next.

Under Allow access to the microphone on this device, select Change. Make sure the toggle is turned On.

If you’re having this issue with a specific app, scroll down to Choose which Microsoft Store apps can access your microphone and make sure that the toggle next to that app is turned On as well.

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