How to windows restore windows 10

How to refresh, reset, or restore your PC

Note: For information about this topic in Windows 10, see Recovery options in Windows 10.

If you’re having problems with your PC, you can:

Refresh your PC to reinstall Windows and keep your personal files and settings. Refresh also keeps the apps that came with your PC and the apps you installed from the Microsoft Store.

Reset your PC to reinstall Windows but delete your files, settings, and apps—except for the apps that came with your PC.

Restore your PC to undo recent system changes you’ve made.

If you’re having trouble starting (booting) your PC, see Windows Startup Settings (including safe mode), and go to the “Get to Windows Startup Settings in the Windows Recovery Environment” section. You can refresh, reset, or restore your PC from the Windows Recovery Environment.

If you want to back up and restore your personal files using File History, see Set up a drive for File History.

Before you start to refresh or reset your PC

In most cases, once you start to refresh or reset your PC, it’ll finish on its own. However, if Windows needs missing files, you’ll be asked to insert recovery media, which is typically on a DVD disc or thumb drive. If that happens, what you’ll need depends on your PC.

If your PC came with Windows 8.1 or Windows RT 8.1, you’ll need the discs or thumb drive that came with your PC. Check the info that came with your PC to see if your PC manufacturer provided these discs or media. In some cases, you might have created them when you first set up your PC.

If you don’t have either of those, you can make them if you have a USB thumb drive of 16 GB or larger. Having a recovery drive can help you troubleshoot and fix problems with your PC, even if it won’t start. For more info, see Create a USB recovery drive.

If you upgraded your PC to Windows 8.1 or Windows RT 8.1 with a DVD, use that disc. If you don’t have Windows 8.1 or Windows RT 8.1 media, contact Microsoft Support.

Refresh, reset, or restore

Select any of the following for more detailed info.

If your PC isn’t performing as well as it once did, and you don’t know why, you can refresh your PC without deleting any of your personal files or changing your settings.

Note: If you upgraded your PC from Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 and your PC has a Windows 8 recovery partition, refreshing your PC will restore Windows 8. You’ll need to upgrade to Windows 8.1 after the refresh has finished.

Warning: Apps you installed from websites and DVDs will be removed. Apps that came with your PC and apps you installed from Microsoft Store will be reinstalled. Windows puts a list of removed apps on your desktop after refreshing your PC.

To refresh your PC

Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, tap Settings, and then tap Change PC settings.
(If you’re using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, click Settings, and then click Change PC settings.)

Tap or click Update and recovery, and then tap or click Recovery.

Under Refresh your PC without affecting your files, tap or click Get started.

Follow the instructions on the screen.

If you want to recycle your PC, give it away, or start over with it, you can reset it completely. This removes everything and reinstalls Windows.

Note: If you upgraded your PC from Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 and your PC has a Windows 8 recovery partition, resetting your PC will restore Windows 8. You’ll need to upgrade to Windows 8.1 after the reset has finished.

Warning: All of your personal files will be deleted and your settings will be reset. All apps that you installed will be removed. Only apps that came with your PC will be reinstalled.

To reset your PC

Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, tap Settings, and then tap Change PC settings.
(If you’re using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, click Settings, and then click Change PC settings.)

Tap or click Update and recovery, and then tap or click Recovery.

Читайте также:  Ppsspp for windows phone

Under Remove everything and reinstall Windows, tap or click Get started.

Follow the instructions on the screen.

Note: You’ll be asked to choose whether you want to erase data quickly or thoroughly. If you choose to erase data quickly, some data might be recoverable using special software. If you choose to erase data thoroughly, this will take longer but it makes recovering data less likely.

If you think an app or driver that you recently installed caused problems with your PC, you can restore Windows back to an earlier point in time, called a restore point. System Restore doesn’t change your personal files, but it might remove recently installed apps and drivers.

System Restore isn’t available for Windows RT 8.1.

Windows automatically creates a restore point when you install desktop apps and new Windows updates, if the last restore point is older than 7 days. You can also create a restore point manually at any time.

To restore your PC to an earlier point in time

Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search.
(If you’re using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search.)

Enter Control Panel in the search box, and tap or click Control Panel.

Enter Recovery in the Control Panel search box, and then tap or click Recovery.

Tap or click Open System Restore, and then follow the instructions.

If you need additional help refreshing, resetting, or restoring your PC, check out the Repair and Recovery community pages in the Windows forum for solutions that other people have found for problems they’ve experienced.

Источник

How to use System Restore in Windows 10

Your guide to PC time travelling

We’ve all wished we could go back in time and do things differently, but with your PC it’s actually possible, thanks to the System Restore feature.

This creates “restore points” that serve as a failsafe whenever a major change occurs on your computer. Whether it’s a failed installation or a botched Registry edit, System Restore can take Windows 10 back to a point before the problems started, all while leaving your precious documents intact.

In this tutorial, we’ll show you how to use System Restore and how it can get your computer back in tip-top shape. Let’s get stuck in.

1. Enable System Restore

System Restore isn’t actually enabled by default in Windows 10, so you’ll need to turn it on. Press Start, then type ‘Create a restore point’ and click the top result. This will open the System Properties window, with the System Protection tab selected.

Click your system drive (usually C), then click Configure. In the window that appears, click “Turn on system protection.” Click Apply, then OK, then click OK on the System Properties window. This will enable System Restore and let it begin protecting your computer.

2. Create a restore point

The good thing about System Restore is that Windows creates restore points automatically whenever it detects a major system change. However, there are times – such as before you install a new program – when it’s a good idea to manually create a restore point.

As before, click Start then type “Create a restore point” and click the first result. Under the System Protection tab, click Create. You are then prompted to name the restore point – make it something descriptive that will help should you need to restore your PC back to this point. Once you’ve done that, click Create.

3. Restore your PC to an earlier point

There are a number of ways to use System Restore to get your PC back to an earlier state. The easiest is to open the System Properties window we’ve been using in the previous steps, then click System Restore. Click Next, then choose a restore point from the on-screen list.

Before you click Next to move on, it’s a good idea to click “Scan for affected programs” to see what (if any) programs will not be installed if you use this restore point. Once you’ve done that, click Close, then Next, then Finish to confirm you want to restore this particular point.

4. Use System Restore in Safe Mode

Sometimes, things like a faulty driver or program can prevent System Restore from working properly. In cases like these, it’s best to try Windows Safe Mode, which runs a barebones version of the operating system to strip out anything that might cause a problem.

Click Start, then type “Change advanced startup options” and click the top result. From the settings window that appears, click “Restart now” under the “Advanced startup” heading.

When your PC restarts, click Troubleshoot, then Advanced options, then System Restore. You should then be able to run System Restore as normal.

5. Can’t boot into Windows? There’s a solution

There are times when an action you’ve taken – such as mistakenly changing a Registry entry – will mean your computer can’t boot into Windows. But, fear not: you can still use System Restore to set things right.

First, your computer must be switched off. Turn it on, then when you see the Windows logo appear, hold the power button until it turns off. Repeat this two more times until you enter the Windows Recovery Environment. As in the previous step, click Troubleshoot, then Advanced options, then System Restore to get started.

6. Software incompatibilities

System Restore may not function correctly if it’s not compatible with certain programs on your computer. In such cases, the culprit is often a program that alters the Windows system itself – virus scanners, registry cleaners and the like. If you’ve run one of these programs and it’s told you to disable System Restore, there’s a good chance that it’ll cause a problem when you try to run Microsoft’s restoration program.

Читайте также:  Windows 10x как установить на планшет

Thankfully, the solution is pretty straightforward – just temporarily disable these programs while you run System Restore. Once you’re back to the restore point, just fire them up again and you’re good to go.

7. A corrupt system (restore)

Occasionally, a created restore point may be corrupted, even if it appears successful. This can be a consequence of step 6, whereby incompatible software has been included in the restore point.

Open up the System Protection window, then click System Restore, then click Next. From here, ignore the most recent restore point and instead choose to restore from the one before. If that works, it is likely that any software you installed between that restore point and the most recent one is the culprit. This is why it’s a good idea to create a restore point before installing any new programs, just in case they cause issues with System Restore.

8. Macrium Reflect Free

Microsoft’s System Restore process is fine, but doesn’t give you a whole lot of control. For many of us, that’s all we need. But, if you want to get your hands dirty with some extra features, give the free version of Macrium Reflect a try.

It’s a bit more involved than System Restore, but lets you take full backups of your drives, schedule backups and even browse the contents of those backups in Windows Explorer. The bonus is that by taking a full backup, it includes your files, which System Restore doesn’t (though it’ll take up more space, too). It’s rock-solid, reliable and free.

Источник

System Restore Point in Windows 10

Read about creating and deleting a restore point, or using it to restore Windows 10. With the help of a restore point you can recover Windows 10 system files as well as restore operability of the operating system, correct errors that suddenly appeared or restore the system back to the condition at the time of creating the restore point.

By default, Windows creates a new restore point when some changes are made to the computer, a driver or an application is installed etc.

Working With Windows 10 Restore Points

How to Create a Computer Restore Point Windows 10

Create a Restore Point Manually

Open Control Panel and go to Recovery / Configure System Restore.

Click Create in the System Properties window that opens.

Add a description in the following window to identify the restore point. The current date and time of creating a restore point are added automatically.

Click Create and wait for the process of creating system restore point to be over.

Adjust Automatic Creation of System Restore Points

How to Delete a Windows 10 Restore Point

The operating system saves restore points Windows 10 onto the hard disk. A certain part of its volume is allocated for this purpose; older restore points are deleted to make room for new ones as the free space in this area grows less.

The following functions are available for working with restore points:

Deleting All Restore Points But The Latest

Click Disk Cleanup, and then in the tab More Options, select System Restore and Shadow Copies.

Deleting All Restore Points Including The Latest

Select Configure in the System Protection tab (in the window System Properties).

Click Delete next to «Delete all restore points for this drive».

How to Recover The Windows 10 From a Restore Point

Attention: recovering your Windows 10 from a restore point affects only system and software settings of the operating system. Using the restore point will delete all programs that have been installed after such restore point was created, but it will not recover files deleted previously.

To recover Windows from a restore point do the following:

Open Control Panel / Recovery / Open System Restore and click Next.

Select a restore point from the list and click Next.

Confirm that you want to start system restore from the restore point and the process will start.

Where Are Restore Point Files Kept?

You can see all available restore points in Control Panel / Recovery / Open System Restore.

Physically, the system restore point files are located in the root directory of your system drive (as a rule, it is C:), in the folder System Volume Information. However, by default users don’t have access to this folder. To go to this directory, you should first make it visible, and then get special rights.

Open Control Panel / Recovery / File Explorer Options / Folder Views.

Uncheck the box next to «Hide protected operating system files» and click Apply. As you do it, the folder System Volume Information will appear in the root directory of disk C:, but access will be denied.

To get access to the folder System Volume Information do the following:

Right-click on the folder and select Properties / Security / Advanced.

Click Continue to get access permission to Windows system folder which contains system restore point files.

Click Add and enter the name of the user which should be granted access rights. Click OK.

Check the box in Basic permissions next to «Full control» and click OK.

Now your user account appears in the Permissions list and you have access to the folder System Volume Information.

Files and folders in this location cannot be deleted manually because they are protected by the system. If you want to clean up the directory System Volume Information, use standard tools allowing you to delete Windows restore points.

Читайте также:  Windows server enable rdp

A System Restore Point Won’t Generate. What Should I Do?

Check the status of the Windows service «Volume Shadow Copy». To do it, here is the way:

System restore points may not be created on a computer where two operating systems are installed, or when the operating system is damaged by malware or viruses.

How to Recover The Windows 10 From a Restore Point Using The Command Prompt

If there are problems with starting your Windows 10 in the ordinary mode, you can bring your system back to normal by launching a restore point from the Command Prompt.

Load Windows in «Safe Mode with Command Prompt»: while the operating system is loading, press F8 and select the corresponding line in Windows Advanced Options Menu.

Select the necessary restore point and click Next.

How to Recover Restore Points Which Have Been Deleted?

The operating system saves restore points Windows 10 onto the hard disk. A certain part of its volume is allocated for this purpose; older restore points are deleted to make room for new ones as the free space in this area grows less.

Restore points can also be deleted manually – see above to learn more about it.

Often, recovering Windows results in loss of important files. Restoring Windows with a restore point, rollback to a previous version of the operating system, resetting the computer, errors in backup software, damaged or overwritten system files, file system errors or HDD bad sectors are only some of the things to cause deletion of data.

Windows recovery will restore operability of the operating system but it can result in loss of user files. It is not always possible to restore Windows operability without a clean installation of the operating system which can also cause loss of files.

Download for free and scan your computer with Hetman Partition Recovery. Learn about the program functions and step-by-step guide.

Have you recovered your Windows 10 operating system from a restore point? Leave your feedback and ask questions in your comments.

Author: Vladimir Artiukh, Technical Writer

Vladimir Artiukh is a technical writer for Hetman Software, as well as the voice and face of their English-speaking YouTube channel, Hetman Software: Data Recovery for Windows. He handles tutorials, how-tos, and detailed reviews on how the company’s tools work with all kinds of data storage devices. Read more

Источник

How To Restore Windows 10 To An Earlier Date

Last Updated on February 24, 2020 by admin 11 Comments

We have already discussed creating a manual system restore point as well as system image backup in Windows 10. In this guide, we will see how to restore Windows 10 to an earlier date with the help of a previously created restore point.

NOTE 1: When you restore Windows 10 to a previous date, your documents, pictures, and other files will be preserved.

NOTE 2: Programs installed after the creation of a selected restore point will be deleted or uninstalled.

NOTE 3: Programs updated after the creation of a selected restore point will be restored to the previous version and will not be uninstalled.

Restoring Windows 10 system to a previous date

Step 1: Type Sysdm.cpl either in the Start menu search box or Run command box and then press Enter key to open System Properties.

Step 2: Once System Properties dialog is opened, switch to System Protection tab.

Step 3: Under the Protection Settings section, make sure that the protection for the system drive (Windows 10 drive) is turned on. Next, under the System Restore section, click the button labeled System Restore to open System Restore wizard.

Step 4: Click the Next button to view all recently created restore points.

NOTE: If you recently performed a system restore using a restore point, you will get the following screen instead of the above screen with an option to undo the system restore. You need to select Choose a different restore point and then click the Next button to view all restore points.

Step 5: If all restore points are not visible, click the option labeled Show more restore points to view all restore points.

As you can see in the picture above, the latest restore point appears at the top and with date, time, and description.

It’s a good idea to know what all programs will be uninstalled when you restore your system using a specific date. To know affected programs, select the restore point that you want to use to restore your system, and then click Scan for affected programs.

As you can see, Windows will display all programs and drivers that will be deleted when you restore your system using the selected restore point. If an application is updated post creating a restore point, the previous version of the program will be restored.

For instance, if you were running Firefox 42 while creating a restore point and updated the same to version 43.0 after some time, Windows will restore Firefox 42 when you restore using the selected restore point. Not a big deal as you can easily update programs and drivers to the latest version with a few clicks.

Step 6: Select the restore point which you would like to use to restore Windows 10 and then click the Next button.

Step 7: Finally, click the Finish button to begin restoring your Windows 10 to the selected restore point.

Your PC will automatically reboot to begin the restore process. This might take up to 20 minutes, depending on the number of programs and settings to be restored.

Once done, you will see “System Restore completed successfully” message on your desktop. That’s it!

Источник

Поделиться с друзьями
Советы экспертов и специалистов
Adblock
detector